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. they looked at the impact of floods in countries like india and parts of asia, what it would have on neighboring countries. guest: if you think about water as our most important life support system and the vehicle through which we'll feel the impacts of climate change whether it's drought, desertification, seasonality of rivers, where before they ran year-round, all of that is going to change the world as we know it. host: we will get to viewer phone calls in a moment. i want to give folks a look at some of what blue august is about on planet green this month. here's a look. >> the ocean needs our help. time is running out. >> people have heard about global warming for years but it is only the past five years that experts really understood that carbon dioxide is causing problems for the oceans as well. what is worrisome it has not been on the radar. >> in a few decades it will profoundly altered oceans chemistry, rapidly making the water more acidic. >> scientists have demonstrated that if we continue to pollute as we are now, the ocean as said it will double by the end of the cen
. we will start right on time. the ambassador from india is here. [laughter] [applause] but councilman jack evans is here. [applause] we have representatives from different embassies, as well. let me begin this morning by introducing our special guest, dr. christina romer. as many of you may know, she is the chair of the council of economic advisers. that position was established by the employment act of 1946 where it was decided that the president of united states needed independent, objective economic analysis and advice. from the time that the council was greeted the late 40's, it has had some of the most distinguished economists serving in that position. it has had a long history of very distinguished economists and dr. romer is within the tradition. she is what the best known economists in the country and one of the best known macro economist in the country. she served for 20 years as a member of the faculty of the university of california, berkeley. in that position, she became an expert on the depression, the causes and consequences, and how the u.s. government responded. she ca
-- question was on the geography between pakistan and india. is it critical that the united states try to play a role? that's on really problematic with respect to the indians in terms of defusing tensions between india and pakistan. is that outside 9 postal -- the portfolio of this group? >> it is outside the portfolio of my job. on the other hand, i am in constant touch with the indians. i met with the indians continually. the new ambassador in washington and i have had dinner recently and she and i are in close touch. i go to indio whenever the schedule permits. i stress we're completely transparent. the secretary of state and my close colleague assistant secretary for south asia, central asian affairs bob blake and i were in india recently and the indians are a major factor in the region. they're the dominant power. improveb -- improving u.s.-indian relations ha been a continual goal of the last three u.s.strations, all which i think have been successful in that regard, starting with president clinton's trip in 2000. i will keep the indians fully informed and i have an indian counterpart w
considering countries in the region like pakistan or india or russia or china? >> the commander -- this is a commander's review of his area of responsibility, which is limited to afghanistan. that is what this assessment is on. it is an assessment of the situation on the ground as general mcchrystal and his team see it. >> we're looking at additional more troops -- >> i am laughing at the hammering and drilling. >> president karzai was saying they might need additional resources. >> if it is determined by the commander that he needs additional resources to complete his mission, that request will be made to the normal chain of command. it will go up through cencom, be validated along the way, and the secretary will make a determination whether or not he recommends to the president additional troops. . . . ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ?Ñ >> is a secretary in touch with countries like india for additional resources? >> i don't know of any communication with india. if he is satisfied with the progress, and i don't think anybody is satisfied with progress, i think wh
the same health care and food as boys. in india, for example, girls are less likely to be vaccinated that be boys and are take on the the hospital only when they are sicker. the girls in india from 1 to 5 years of age are 50% more likely to die than boys their age. in addition, ultra sound machines have allowed a pregnant woman to find out the sex of her own fetus and then get an abortion if it's female. the global statistics on the abuse of girls are numbing. it appears that more girls and women are now missing from the planet precisely because they are female than men were killed on the batting field in all of the wars of the 20th century. so with a new administration in power and with a female woman heading the state department, how should u.s. priorities on women's issues internationally change? guest: the secretary of state hillary clinton is doing a marvelous job of highlighting the issue of women's equality around the world. one thing that we need to do in this country is the united states senate needs to ratify the united nations women's convention, the convention on the elim
, and india, and brazil, as long as they are there, been the fta problem is marginal. and then you have done doha round, it essential to poor countries and i think american farmers and ranchers have a bad case that their industry is more restricted and limited by foreign trade and any other. but agriculture is 8% of american exports. it is not going to grow even if there is a successful doha round. i think the administration goes to the public and say that we want to push for doha just as it is, the public should say the president is a smart guy and we trust him. given that trade is a dissident and difficult issue within the democratic party, i think that if the administration is going to make a big push for trade and spend capital on it, it has to have a different agenda that will do more for america as an economy and do more for our national security goals as a nation. let me give three points from my paper that i would like to say. one is, we need to look harder at ourselves and our own policies. they are not very good. if you look at the american system, we collect $25 million of tariffs
in india. we think by using a fairly systemic framework, we can put in a system where we can change the economics so that we can make it in our best interest and our suppliers best interest to understand that it is in their best interest to keep these systems truly supplied in a secure fashion, rather than allow them to be counterfeited. one thing i would say in addition to this is that we try to take a risk management approach to this. while we are worried about the supply chain, this is a problem that is generally not a big problem for industry. the reason is, it is usually easier and less costly if you are going to attack bank of america to attack it for software of one of these traditional hacks. is much harder to do it through the supply chain attack by putting something in the computer. however, from the government's perspective, this is an extremely serious problem, because if a weapons system could be infected through a manufactured attack, you cannot detect it. you do not get rid of it when the software is there, and it is absolutely possible to put in a back door or troja
a contract, making sure the performance is primary and that the elements india work the plan are followed. >> thank you. i appreciate your sticking around until we got to this panel to hear from you and respond to our questions. there are probably colleagues that will want to submit questions for the record. if you could have you responses back within two weeks after you received our questions, we would appreciate that very much. i was reflecting on what we have heard from this panel and what we have heard from our first panel. i always think about what the take the weight should be for us. -- i always think about what they take away should be for us. it is important to clearly outlined the objectives of an agency. they should know that and be able to clearly outlined their objectives and what they need from a contractor. i think mr. assad talked about measuring outcomes and not process. that is a theme that several of you touched upon. i think that one of you talked about cost-benefit analysis, using clear and measurable criteria as an important point. we need clear guidelines from omb.
in december. there are international negotiations. i do not know how to get china and india to come along. if they will go along with it and we will not lose all manufacturers to china -- you understand china is in number one emitter of pollution, not the united states. they do not want to do it. india is even more adamant about doing it. then we lose their jobs. we need to get china under the umbrella and it takes a 2/3 vote in the senate to get it done. i think there is some protection for our consumers and interesindustry. >> glad to see you again today. i am a veteran. i am very proud to be a veteran. [applause] i belong to the american legion. in order for a person to be called a veteran that has to serve in the military, there are lots of people that are called veterans that cannot belong to the american legion. congress after world war roman one set up the american legion. is the largest veterans' organization in the world. we have a lot of people. in order to belong to the american legion, you had to be in the service during a war. we had a lot of people that after correa, vietnam
friendly towards india, so they are sheltering these as an asset on behalf of pakistan. it will be difficult to be successful meaningfully in afghanistan as long as group like this network and the taliban continue to be harbored without interference on the pakistani side of the border. host: this morning this writer writes the article saying "american officials have grown increasingly disenchanted with karzai's leadership of the past five years. " guest: yes, it is certainly cause for concern. one of the things we realized this summer is that governments, the ability to govern, or degree to which is correct, or taking predatory actions -- this is a winner of this position. will not fall to the network or the taliban anytime soon, but we have been discharged and largely by the way, some of the behavior that thoughkarzai government has engaged -- that the karzai has engaged in of the last few years. the corruption. everywhere i went this past summer, every direction -- all over afghanistan, each identified government corruption. we have some issues with that karzai regime
senator kennedy very well. in addition, a statement from our ambassador to india that we're also going to forward. but those brief remarks, i will take questions. >> can you elaborate at all on the very productive and good progress, what it means? >> as they noted in their statement, we plan to continue talks next week. there will be a delegation coming from israel to talk to a special envoy michel. -- mitchell. we do want to make sure that these talks continue to have forward movement, as you noted. that they make good progress. i did not note that. the statement noted that. >> the statement noted that. let's let these talks play out. we have another set next week. there is room for optimism. i do not want to get into anything that will in any way cause any kind of obstruction to this movement. dave? >> in connection with the guardian newspaper, the story on the breakthrough in the middle east, one of the tenants of the store was that the united states is prepared to link its policy with iran. in other words, a harder line on iran by the united states. an incentive for the israelis. c
in this direction, which is exactly what they have in the national health care system in great britain. >> and india's committees, that will lead is the president on where they should spend the money and use the money. comparative spending, likely approved by the president, and it gets down to the point that you just made. kathleen sebelius, the head of europe -- health and human services -- [booing] i was on cnn with her a week ago, and what she said is, don't be distracted by the details. [laughter] well, the american people are focused on the details. we care about the details. that is what this is all about. is very personal. it affects everyone of us very personally. let's do a show of hands, how many people think that you are personally out of your pockets will be paying more for health care than you are paying right now? look at that. every hand is going up. how many people here in the audience thinks that your health care is going to be worse than it is right now? every hand goes up. so the details matter to everyone in this room and we're going to fight over the details. [applause] >> carol
to india and i would like to do the same thing. a lot of those places testify and served america, completely undeserved -- typifiey and servd america -- unserved america. let's first of all, do no harm, and then hopefully do some good to expand the number going forward. and with fcc reform, this is obviously something near and dear to my heart since i began talking to the commissioner eight years ago, but especially in the last few months, i want to thank acting chairman copps and the acting chairman for starting the ball rolling. arbys the, you have outlined a couple of ideas from the macro to the micro, and i want to thank you for,+0ñ especially for getting some of the low hanging fruit, some of those things that can be done in internet time, and austin, for reacting very quickly even before his first meeting to get some of the legal calendar information up and running as well. i think that makes us more consumer friendly. and thank you for such things as we initiating after many years many of the senior -- a read-initiating after many years many of the senior advisor rooster
be released through cell phones. we have heard a lot about the penetration of cell phones in india and china and africa, where you can go to villages and you create new information markets. the same way, the story that has been told in the u.s. is as you look at schools and literacy, one of the most common factors we find is a lot of the people actually have cell phones. one of the primary means of communication is still through text messaging and figuring out how can we tap into that space? how do we look at the cell networks and communications there to figure out in what context do we think about democracy and the cell phone itself, and not just broadband and the second window? >> one of the challenges we found was that families of low income typically a single mother, might get, that if her kids were not on line and capable of being able to have the skills of producing a video to communicate have the skills of the video literacy and being able to understand how they can access services, that they would have a difficult time being as successful as their peers. we set up an interim program
, but he can be in the left this out than why our contractors from india dressed as civilians along the afghani /iranian border building roads. why did he leave that out? people need to wake up in this country and what these people are all about. thank you for allowing me to speak my word. host: margaret on the republican line. caller: good morning. thank you for taking my call. i have a question regarding the health care debate. all of our representatives in alabama are republican and i have been waiting for them to have a town hall meetings so that we can join in the debate. i have heard nothing. i had written to our representative and the only response i get is that they are opposed to the president's plan, but there is nothing about what republicans proposals are to do something about the cost of health care. i would like for someone to challenge the republicans to find out what it is they are proposing we do about the rising cost of health care. host: next comment comes from vermont this is ron on the democrats' line. caller: i believe that more science needs to be put into thi
that this economy will be an economy that can compete with china and india and that this is about the beginning of the conclusion of all workers into that economy and all members that deserve to be uplifted. today is the sound of the smell as sweet justice. -- of sweet justice. [unintelligible] >> this campaign is not just a campaign, it is a coalition. there are a number of organizations that have signed on to us. it is not just the hip-hop caucus or green for all doing this. how we're going to do this? this is not a dream jobs moment, is a clean energy movement. for us, we have to convince our generation that this truly is our moment for the 21st century. we have to go out there and convince them that if we do not make a change now, nine years into the 21st century, there will not be a 22nd century. the time is now. we had joined together with the help of the administration and we know we can do that and change happens now. >> a couple of questions. we understand that greening is expensive p and. we will not see the economic benefits for decades. how can a community, african american communit
are working in india and africa and other developing countries to train professionals. this combination of insurance coverage and trained professionals is going to be absolutely key. then we are going to get kids on the right trajectory and then we have to look step-by-step to see how we can support children with autism to be the most productive citizens they can. >> thank you very much for that helpful analysis of some of the options we should consider. i wanted to call on you next. >> the task force looked at this extensively in mississippi because of our financial situation of many of our parents. publicly, there were intervention programs that do not cover services. it needs to now include behavioral services because many of the sturgeon are being identified very early. i can anecdotally speak to the success of that. i met a precious toddler named catalina. her mother recognized autism signs it at eight months. the child is 4 years old now and it is absolutely amazing. you would never recognize that she was a child in the spectrum. i anecdotally i saw that working. the other program
and india to pollujtuáÑ over our spaces for energy. we need to look at what is efficient and (+ive. these first two policies, the stimulus bill and kappa and trade, i can tell you what i'm against. but i will also tell you what i i know you have questions about how many of you think that health care does not need any changes or any type of reform whatsoever? @ñplease raise your hand. i we say there is one in the crowd during -- i always÷ say there is one in the crowd. how many think that we need to do something, but the approach matters. absolutely. d+zbut the consensus -- the #consensus is for reform. az4=i the sake of action is ì(lc@&c+ you have to make sure that you do it right, not just quickly. what we have seen out of washingtonÑ is their intent to act quickly. i think in a way it is flawed. i will tell you what i am for and against. let me begin[÷f with where i am against. dthis is a jar-3200, the house version -- this is hr-éíb3200sg health-care plan. i can tell you what i am against. i4vq am againstksg this plan. i will tell you why and i know you are going to hav
that they are all from india. now, you have 60% unemployment in iraq why the heck are we bringing in foreign workers? you ought to put some people from iraq to work. it just seems that there are no requirements in the contracts that would help the overall cause of putting people to work and stabilizing that country. from your own attendance there, your own observations on the ground, what you think needs to be done first and the fastest? >> i think the first thing we need to do is to encourage the department of defense to make this one of their highest priorities. we have spent in contracting $103 billion, in afghanistan $20 billion, in kuwait $8 billion. we have spent $12.7 billion in countries is supporting afghanistan. what we know is that we do not have enough contract office representatives agreed we do not have enough quality assurance representatives. we do not have enough log cap support officers. we do not have enough people watching the contractors. we have 70% of our contract going to subcontractors. our law in this country makes it a requirement that we can only oversee the subcontractor
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)